Abakundakawa, Rwanda

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Abakundakawa, Rwanda

125.00
  • Varieties: Red Bourbon types
  • Treatment: Washed, triple fermented
  • Grower: Abakundakawa Cooperative
  • Altitude: 1750-1850 masl
  • Village: Minazu
  • Region: Rushashi, Gakenke District
  • Roast profile: Medium light
  • Screen size: 15 +
  • 200 gram
  • Notable: Fully organic, although not certified as such. 
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125 SEK ≈ € 12 ≈ ¥ 1598

Abakundakawa means “People Who Love Coffee” in Kinyarwanda and is the fitting name for a cooperative that consistently delivers some of Rwanda's most sought after coffees. The cooperative consists of 1961 small scale coffee growers and has two wet mills, with the Rushashi mill being its primary processing center. This mill is located in the lush and green Gakenke district, characterised by high spiky hills at high altitude - making it ideal for high quality coffee production. The Rusashi station employs a particularly long wet fermentation process – 48 hours on average – which may be part of why these coffees are so prized. Most Rwandan washing stations ferment for only one day. The longer fermentation process is more labour intensive, but it pays off in taste: Abakundakawa coffees regularly get high and prominent scores on Cup of Excellence auctions.

Another interesting facet of Abakundakawa is the particularly prominent role played by its women’s associations, both culturally and in terms of overall production: More than 2/3rds of the co-op's total coffee is grown by women land owners. In recent years these women have learned that the label “produced by women” has a marketable value, and now sell their coffees separately at a premium. This in turn has sparked a discussion among traditional households (with husbands) about ownership of the coffee trees. In Rwandan smallholder families, the coffee trees are owned by men - but if women receive a premium for their produce, it can benefit all financially to pass some of this ownership to the women in the households. This development is slowly but steadily helping Rwandan women’s emancipation and position in society underway.  

Taste notes: coffee blossom or jasmin, oolong tea